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Alpha Stim and Anxiety

Alpha-Stim electrotherapy works on psychiatric disorders, such as anxiety, by producing alterations in electric activity in large-scale brain networks. Research suggests that Alpha-Stim® CES modulates large-scale brain network activity patterns in two synergistic ways: by stimulating cranial nerves including the vagus nerve, and directly modulating oscillations in the temporal lobe which is part of the default mode network. In clinical trials, patients reported an average of 61% less anxiety immediately after using the CES therapy. After 5 weeks, that average was 94%.

Improve Overall Function

  • Improves stress response
  • Reduces Anxiety
  • Improves sleep quality and duration
  • Safe with no adverse effects
  • Enhances response to other therapies like tDCS, NFB, and HBOT

REFERENCE

  1. Barclay TH, Barclay RD. A clinical Trial of cranial electrotherapy stimulation for anxiety and comorbid depression. Journal of Affective Disorders. 2014;164:171-177. Presented at the American Psychological Association National Conference, Honolulu, July 2013.
  2. Lee S-H, Kim W-Y, Lee C-H, et al. Effects of cranial electrotherapy stimulation on preoperative anxiety, pain and endocrine response. Journal of International Medical Research. 2013; 41(6) 1788–1795.

Study: A clinical Trial of cranial electrotherapy stimulation for anxiety and comorbid depression.

Background: Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent mental disorders and are usually treated with medication and/or psychotherapy. When anxiety disorders are accompanied with comorbid depression, this further complicates the treatment process. Medication compliance is a common problem due to adverse side effects and new and effective treatments that have minimal side effects are needed for the treatment of anxiety and depression. This study used a randomized, double-blind, sham controlled design to examine the effectiveness of CES as a treatment for anxiety disorders and comorbid depression in a primary care setting. The study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01533415.

Methods: One hundred and fifteen participants, age 18 years and over, with a primary diagnosis of an anxiety disorder were enrolled from February 2012 to December 2012 The Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A) and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale17 (HAM-D17) were used for baseline and outcome measures at weeks one, three, and five. Response to treatment was defined as a reduction of ≥50% or more on these measures.

Results: Analysis of covariance revealed a significant difference between the active CES group and the sham CES group on anxiety (p=0.001, d=0.94) and on depression (p=0.001, d=0.78) from baseline to endpoint of study in favor of the active CES group.

Conclusions: CES significantly decreases anxiety and comorbid depression. Subjects reported no adverse events during the study.

REFERENCE

  1. Barclay TH, Barclay RD. A clinical Trial of cranial electrotherapy stimulation for anxiety and comorbid depression. Journal of Affective Disorders. 2014;164:171-177. Presented at the American Psychological Association National Conference, Honolulu, July 2013.